Vegetarian Diet Foods

Weight Loss Diets for Vegetarians( Not HCG Diet)

Weight Loss Diets for Vegetarians has become very popular in South Florida, especially with the South Beach crowd that are into organic and “healthy” food and lifestyles. There are more than 30 vegan restaurants and that many markets between Key West and Palm Beach!  Even for vegans those that eat large amounts of carbohydrates, weight loss does not have to be difficult. The problem is usually finding low calorie non-animal protein sources and watching saturated fats.

In another post I outline the use of the 800 Calorie HCG diet for Vegans.

Vegetarians and Health

Whether vegans or vegetarians are healthier than meat eaters is not the issue in this discussion. No doubt, overall they are less likely to be overweight and generally have lower blood pressure, triglycerides and cholesterol than meat eaters. However, some vegetarians eat large amounts of carbs and do have weight problems. Whether they live longer has not been proven. A 2003 study of British vegetarians, including vegans, found similar mortality rates between “vegetarians” and other groups.

A 1999 meta-study of five studies comparing vegetarian and non-vegetarian mortality rates in western countries found the mortality rate to be highest among vegans and those who eat meat regularly, followed by vegetarians and those who eat meat infrequently. The lowest mortality rate was demonstrated by those who ate fish, but no other meat.

Vegetarian Weight Loss DishesI leave it to others to decide if vegan-ism will prolong life. The answer certainly is not in. My feeling (unproven, of course) is that man evolved eating meat and meat products and the true vegans I have seen seem to be missing something. Perhaps it is the fact that many people are not compensating for the natural vitamins and minerals they are not receiving from eating meat and dairy. Or perhaps, because their choice of diet is so strict, they feel that they can eat more processed foods because they are not eating meat high in fat. Whatever the case is, they are not the really skinny people.

Despite all of the low calorie foods, obesity does exist in the vegan population. Few weight loss diets have been tailored for vegans. Although not a vegan diet, Weight Watchers can be adapted to the vegan lifestyle. Since the emphasis is on fruits and vegetables with low points, there is a lot of food. However, it really is not the best choice for weight loss.

Dr. Lipman’s Food Suggestions for His Vegan Miami Diet(not HCG)

  • Fruits (5 per day): apples, peaches, all berries, pears, oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, cantaloupes, nectarines, (limes and lemons are free). Berry portions are 1/2 cup.
  • Seasonings (unlimited): lemon, garlic, thyme, parsley, plum vinegar, apple cider vinegar, sea salt, basil, pepper, balsamic vinegar, garlic salt
  • Vegetables (unlimited): spinach, lettuce, cucumbers, cabbage, tomatoes, asparagus, onions, celery, broccoli, radishes, kale, Brussels sprouts, green beans, mushrooms, peppers, zucchini, cauliflower, dill pickles, bean sprouts, beets, squash, egg plant, bok choy, pumpkin
  • Beverages: diet sodas, green tea, black tea, carbonated water, coffee, tea, crystal light, Diet V-8 Splash, Lactose free soy milk or Almond milk permissible in small quantities, PowerAde Zero (like Gatorade® with no sugar)
  • Salad dressings: Wishbone or Ken’s spray dressing, Walden Farms No Calorie-No Fat-No sugar dressing, NO OLIVE OIL
  • Condiments and Additives: Equal, Splenda, Stevia, Heinz reduced sugar Ketchup, soy, Tabasco, Picante, horseradish, PAM and other no calorie aerosol based cooking sprays, pickles, olives, sugar free salsa, soy mayonnaise
  • Noodles: Miracle noodles, Shirataki noodles (usually found in the produce section of the supermarket since they must be kept cold)
  • Crackers (3 a day): Melba toasts, Grissini breadsticks, Wasa, Finn, Gilda toasts, Flatout Light wrap (a no sugar, no fat, high protein wrap), La Tortilla Factory Low Carb
  • Snacks: Soy Crisp Chips, Walden Farms Spreads, Sugar free popsicles, Hummus (watch the amount of olive oil–Weight Watchers has a low calorie, low olive oil recipe), vegetarian cheese

Follow a meal by meal vegan weight loss plan for 3 weeks.

Dr Lipman’s Vegan Protein Products for Weight Loss

Vegetarian RecipesBelow are many of the products I recommend to my vegan and vegetarian weight loss patients. They contain the protein you need and fit the carb/calorie requirements of the diet plans.

Vegetarian Boca Burger Products

All-American Flame Grilled
The All-American Flame Grilled Boca Burger contains 120 calories, 45 of which are calories from fat. There is 5g of total fat, 1.5g of which is saturated fat. It contains 5mg of cholesterol, 380mg of sodium, 6g of carbohydrates, 5 of which come from fiber and 14g of protein. In addition, this burger patty provides 15 percent of the recommended daily value of calcium and 10 percent of the recommended daily value of iron.

Original Vegan
The Original Vegan Boca Burger contains 70 calories, 5 of which are calories from fat. There is 0.5g of total fat, none of which is saturated fat. It contains no cholesterol, 260mg of sodium, 6g of carbohydrates, 4 of which come from fiber and 13g of protein. In addition, this burger patty provides 6 percent of the recommended daily value of calcium and 10 percent of the recommended daily value of iron.

Grilled Vegetable
The Grilled Vegetable Boca Burger contains 80 calories, 10 of which are calories from fat. It contains no cholesterol, 300mg of sodium, 7g of carbohydrates, 4of which come from fiber and 12g of protein. In addition, this burger patty provides 6 percent of the recommended daily value of calcium and 10 percent of the recommended daily value of iron.

Textured Vegetable Protein (TVP®)

TVP is made from 50% soy protein/soy flour or concentrate, but can also be made from cotton seeds, wheat, and oats. It is produced from soy flour after the soybean oil has been extracted, then cooked under pressure, extruded, and dried. TVP® has a long shelf-life if stored properly and is an excellent source of protein and fiber. It is made into chips, flakes or chunks. TVP® contains absolutely no meat or meat byproducts, so it’s perfect for those who are on strict vegetarian diet. TVP® can be purchased flavored with beef, chicken, sausage and ham. One half cup dry TVP® = 80 calories, 0g fat, 3g sugar, 13g protein, and 7g total carbs.

Tofu and Soy Products:

First used in China around 200 B.C., tofu has long been a staple of Asian cuisine. Tofu soaks up flavors and is best when marinated for at least 30 minutes or served with a flavorful sauce. There are two types of tofu that you’ll want to try:

  1. Fresh, Water-Packed Tofu (always refrigerated): Best for when you want the tofu to hold its shape, such as when baking or grilling
  2. Silken Tofu: Packed in aseptic boxes and usually not refrigerated.

Try firm or extra-firm tofu for baking, grilling, sauteing, and frying and soft or silken tofu for creamy sauces, desserts, and dressings. To give tofu a meatier texture, try freezing it for 2 to 24 hours and then defrosting it. Press the water out of the tofu prior to preparing it. Wrap the tofu in a towel and set something heavy on top of it for at least 20 minutes, and it will be ready for marinades, sauces, freezing, and cooking.

You may have tried tofu and soy milk before, but what about edamame, soy ice cream, soy yogurt, soy nuts or soy cheese? TVP® and tempeh are also protein-rich soy foods. As an added bonus, many brands of tofu and soymilk are fortified with other nutrients that vegetarians and vegans need, such as calcium, iron and vitamin B12. Protein content: A half-cup of tofu contains 10 grams, and soy milk contains 7 grams of protein per cup.

Tempeh
This traditional Indonesian food is made from fermented soybeans and other grains. Unlike tofu, which is made from soybean milk, tempeh contains whole soybeans, making it denser. Because of its density, tempeh should be braised in a flavorful liquid for at least one hour prior to cooking. It’s actually similar to a very firm veggie burger, and, like tofu and seitan, it’s quite high in protein and can be prepared in a myriad of ways, making if perfect for vegetarians and vegans.

Protein content: Varies by brand, but as a guideline, one serving of tempeh (100 grams) provides about 18 grams of protein (that’s even more protein per gram than tofu!) Tempeh is a great alternative for folks who don’t like tofu.

Seitan
Seitan is derived from the protein portion of wheat (gluten). It replaces meat in many recipes and works so well that a number of vegetarians avoid it because the texture is too “meaty.” When simmered in a traditional broth of soy sauce or tamari, ginger, garlic, and kombu (seaweed), it is called seitan. Others simply call it gluten. Commercially made mixes include Arrowhead Mills’ Seitan Quick Mix or any of the Knox Mountain products, which include Wheat Balls, Chicken Wheat, and Not-So- Sausage as well as White Wave and Lightlife Foods.

Ener-G® Egg Replacer™ (an egg substitute for recipes)

Ener-G® Egg Replacer™ is made from non-animal sources and replaces eggs for those on the vegan diet or those who cannot have eggs. Ener-G® Egg Replacer™ greatly simplifies baking and allows you to enjoy a variety of delicious egg-free baked goods. It is not nutritionally the same as eggs, but it does mimic what eggs do in a baking recipe. It works best in recipes made from scratch. It will not make scrambled eggs. Ener-G® Egg Replacer™ may work well in some pre-made commercial mixes, but not in all of them.

It is made from Potato Starch, Tapioca Flour, Leavening (Calcium Lactate, Calcium Carbonate, Cream of Tartar), Cellulose Gum, and Modified Cellulose. It is 100% egg-free (contains NO eggs nor animal protein), it is also gluten-free, wheat-free, casein-free, dairy-free, yeast-free, soy-free, tree nut-free, peanut-free, sodium-free, cholesterol-free, and it’s low in protein. 1- 1/2 teaspoons of dry Ener-G® Egg Replacer™ plus 2 tablespoons of warm water equals one egg. Mix thoroughly before adding to the recipe. One replaced egg contains 15 calories, 0g fat, 5mg sodium, 4g carbohydrates, 0g sugar, 0g protein.

The Vegg – Vegan “Egg Yolk” Mix

The Vegg Vegan Egg Yolk is a 100% plant-based egg yolk replacement that contains only natural ingredients and 0g fat. For 2-3 yolks, simply mix 1 teaspoon of The Vegg with 1/4 cup of water in a blender and blend until smooth. Then, use the mixture as you would traditional eggs. You can use it in any recipe that calls for egg yolks such as soups and dressings. It also makes delicious tofu scrambles.

Vegetarian Cheese

Cheese can be made with or without rennet (which is derived from the stomach tissue of a slaughtered calf). This discussion is about those cheeses which are made without the use of rennet. Today, more and more cheeses are made with “microbial enzymes”, which are widely used in the industry because they are a consistent and inexpensive coagulant. The term “microbial enzyme” means it is a synthetically developed coagulant. The term “vegetable rennet” means it is derived from a vegetable source. Soft cheeses such as cream cheese and cottage cheese are manufactured without rennet. Some cottage cheeses, however, may contain gelatin which is derived from animal sources. All labels should be read carefully.

Brands include Land-o-Lakes, California Select, Cabot, Boars Head, and many more. Click here for a cheese list by brand.

All About Shirataki Noodles
  • Made of naturally water soluble fiber with no fat, sugar, or starch
  • Contain zero net carbohydrates and almost zero calories
  • Gluten-Free and Wheat-Free – made of a healthy natural fiber called Glucomannan
  • Kosher
  • Easily absorbs the flavors of any soup, dish, or sauce
  • Instant and come in a variety of styles: macaroni, spaghetti, fettuccine, angel hair
  • Beneficial effects backed by medical studies for diabetes, constipation, obesity

Shirataki (shee-rah-TAH-kee) noodles are thin, low carb, chewy, and translucent traditional Japanese noodles. They are also sometimes called konnyaku noodles. Shirataki noodles are thinner than wheat noodles, do not break as easily, and have a different texture. They are mostly composed of a dietary fiber called glucomannan and contain very few calories and carbohydrates (sometimes even zero). They do not have much flavor by themselves, but absorb flavors well from other ingredients you can combine them with.

Shirataki noodles are packaged “wet”, that is, you purchase them pre-packaged in liquid, and they are ready-to-eat out of the package. You can prepare them by boiling them briefly or running them under hot water, then combining them with other dishes, or adding things like tofu, garlic, spinach, or soy sauce to enhance the flavor. If you’ve never eaten Shirataki noodles before, try a small amount initially to ensure you won’t experience any stomach or intestinal distress.

How Do I Cook Shirataki Noodles?

Cooking Shirataki noodles by themselves is relatively straightforward. Since Shirataki noodles are packaged pre-cooked, you simply heat them up and enjoy. The liquid that Shirataki noodles are packaged in has a slight fishy/seafood smell to it, so it’s recommended that you run the noodles under water for a couple of minutes before you eat them. To add flavor, you can add:

  • Salt
  • Soy sauce( low sodium)
  • Garlic powder or garlic cloves
  • >Tofu
  • Spaghetti sauce (sugar free), sugar free pizza sauce
  • Vegetables, chicken, sea food especially shrimp, beef

Dr. John McDoughall Strict Vegetarian Weight Loss Plan

Dr. John McDoughall, a medical doctor from Santa Rosa, CA, advocates a low calorie, vegan weight loss plan. It is probably the best plan of it’s type. The emphasis is on low-fat, whole foods. The basic rules are that you are allowed all the vegetables, beans, and whole, unprocessed grains that you need to satisfy your hunger. However, you are limited to two fruit servings a day. The problem often arises from the fact than no flour products or oils are permitted. Refined soy products are not permitted. Sugar and salt are allowed on top of the foods, but not to be cooked into the foods. Often dairy and eggs are eliminated as a way to speed up the process. A normal rate of weight loss is 1-2 pounds a week.

For most vegans, the biggest downsides are the bread, fruit and pasta limitations. If you are considering such a plan, here are the “Eats” and “Don’t Eats” of the plan. (Please note these are Dr. McDougals’s ideas):

Colas and un-colas Mineral water or seltzer (flavored or plain)

Don’t Eat Possible Substitutes
Cow’s Milk (for cereal or cooking) Low Fat soy milk, rice milk, fruit juice, water, use extra when cooking hot cereal or pour over cold cereal
Cow’s Milk (as beverage) None; drink water, juice, herb tea, or cereal beverages
Butter None
Cheese None; after 12 days you may substitute soy- and nut-based cheeses
Cottage cheese None; after 12 days you may substitute crumbled tofu
Yogurt None
Sour cream None
Ice cream Pure fruit sorbet, frozen juice bars; after 12 days you may substitute Lite Tofutti
Eggs (in cooking) Ener-G Egg Replacer
Eggs (for eating) None
Meat, poultry, fish Starchy vegetables, whole grains, pastas, and beans; after 12 days you may substitute tofu “meat” recipes
Mayonnaise Tofu mayonnaise
Vegetable oils (for pans) None; use Teflon, Silverstone, or silicone-coated (Baker’s Secret) pot and pans
Vegetable oils (in recipes) None; omit oil or replace with water, mashed banana, or applesauce for moisture
White rice (refined) Whole grain (brown) rice or other whole grains
White flour (refined) Whole grain flours, Refined and sugar-coated cereals, any acceptable hot or cold cereal
Coconut None
Chocolate Carob powder
Coffee Decaffeinated coffee, and black tea Non-decaffeinated herb tea, cereal beverages, hot water with lemon

Weight Loss Meal Suggestions from Physicians  for Responsible Medicine

http://www.pcrm.org/health/health-topics/a-guide-to-healthy-weight-loss

Breakfast

Often breakfast can be similar to the one you are accustomed to with a few simple modifications.

  • Hot cereals: oatmeal, cream of wheat, creamy rice cereal, grits, or Irish oatmeal with cinnamon, raisins and/or applesauce (no milk)
  • High-fiber cold cereals: wheat or oat bran cereals with non-fat soy or rice milk and berries, peaches, or bananas
  • Melons, such as cantaloupe and honeydew, or any other fruit
  • Whole grain toast topped with cinnamon or jam (no butter or margarine)
  • Bagels (no cream cheese) topped with apple butter or hummus
  • Oven-roasted “home fries” plain or smothered with roasted mushrooms, peppers, and onions

If you like extra protein:

  • Fat-free meat substitutes, such as Gimme LeanT fat-free “sausage”
  • English baked beans or chickpeas
  • Breakfast
    burrito filled with fat-free refried beans, lettuce, and tomato (no egg or cheese)
  • Tofu scrambler or marinated tempeh in small amounts

Lunch

Whether you dine in or out at lunchtime, there are lots of healthy and delicious options to choose from. Here are some ideas to get you started.

Salads

  • Garden salad with lemon juice, fat-free dressing, or soy or teriyaki sauce
  • Legume-based salads: three-bean, chickpea, lentil, or black bean and corn salads
  • Grain-based salads: noodle, couscous, bulgur, or rice salads

Soups

  • Vegetable-based soups: potato-leek, carrot-ginger, mixed vegetable, or mushroom-barley.
  • Legume-based soups: black bean, vegetarian chili, spinach lentil, minestrone, or split pea.
  • Instant or prepared soups (as long as they are low-fat and free of animal products).

Sandwiches/Wraps

  • CLT: cucumber, lettuce, and tomato sandwich with Dijon mustard
  • Hummus sandwich tucked into whole wheat pita with grated carrots, sprouts, and cucumbers
  • Sandwich made with fat-free meat alternatives such as barbeque seitan or veggie pepperoni slices with your favorite sandwich veggies
  • Black bean dip, peppers, tomatoes, and lettuce wrapped in a whole-wheat tortilla
  • Italian eggplant sub: baked eggplant slices, pizza sauce, and mushrooms on a multi-grain sub roll
  • Black bean and sweet potato burrito with corn and tomatoes

Other Ideas and Add-Ons

  • Last night’s leftovers
  • Fresh fruit, applesauce, or fruit cup packed in juice
  • Cut-up vegetables
  • Rice cakes, fat-free crackers, baked tortilla chips

Dinner

Emphasize vegetables and grains in all your meals. The evening meal is a good place to try new items. You might start with a bean, rice or other grain, or potato dish and add a couple of vegetables.

Starches:

  • Grains: Use generous amounts of grains.
    • pasta
    • brown rice
    • boxed rice dishes (e.g., pilaf, curried rice, etc.)
    • couscous
  • Potatoes: Enjoy them baked or mashed and topped with steamed vegetables, salsa, ketchup, Dijon mustard, black pepper, or black beans.
  • Breads: Whole-grain is preferred. Avoid sweet breads that contain oil, eggs, or milk.

Vegetables:

Try any vegetables you like.

  • Greens (broccoli, spinach, kale, Swiss chard) topped with lemon
  • Carrots
  • Corn (note: corn is technically a grain, but works as a vegetable)

Legumes:

  • Pinto beans, vegetarian refried beans, baked beans, black beans, garbanzos, kidney beans

Main Dishes:

  • Pasta marinara: Choose commercial brands that are free of cheese and are low in fat.
  • Beans and rice: Try black beans with salsa, vegetarian baked beans, or fat-free refried beans.
  • Soft tacos: Prepare this dish with whole-wheat flour tortilla, beans, lettuce, tomato, and salsa.
  • Chili: Vegetarian boxed versions are fine.
  • Veggie lasagna: Made with low-fat tofu to replace the ricotta, layered with grilled veggies.
  • Rice pilaf, Spanish rice, or packaged rice dinners: Try packaged rice dishes and omit butter.
  • Steamed rice and stir-fried vegetables: This meal can be seasoned with soy sauce. Be sure to use a non-stick pan.
  • Fat-free vegetarian burgers: Make your own lentil burgers or try soy-based commercial brands.
  • Fajitas: Lightly sauté sliced bell peppers, onions, and eggplant in a non-stick pan, with fajita seasonings.

Desserts

  • Fresh fruit
  • Fat-free chocolate or fruit sorbet
  • Popsicles
  • Baked apples

Snacks

  • Bagels (plain or flavored; no cheese, butter, or margarine)
  • Fruit, carrots, or celery sticks
  • Vegetarian soup cups (split pea, lentil, etc.)
  • Toast with jam (no butter or margarine)
  • Baked tortilla chips with salsa or bean dip

GENERAL TIPS

TRYING NEW FOODS AND NEW TASTES:

  • Explore new recipes, new books, new products.
  • Fat-free meat substitutes can ease the transition.
  • Be strict with yourself. This is easier than teasing yourself with small amounts of the foods you are trying to leave behind.
  • Focus on the short term. Three weeks is a short time.
  • Frozen vegetables are fine.
  • Canned beans and vegetables are okay for convenience.
  • If you have trouble finding recipes you like, explore our recipe database or try a healthy, vegan cookbook.

CUTTING THE FAT:

  • Use a non-stick pan.
  • “Sauté” vegetables in water or vegetable broth.
  • Steam vegetables.
  • When you can’t avoid oil, use a cooking spray instead of poured oils.
  • Use non-fat, non-dairy coffee creamers.
  • Read package labels to check grams of fat per serving. It is best to choose products that have less than 2 grams of fat per serving.

ON THE GO:

  • Travel Tips:
    • Request non-dairy vegetarian meals for flights
    • All hotel restaurants have oatmeal, pasta with tomato sauce, potatoes, and vegetable plates, even if these items are not on the menu.
    • Bring along instant soup cups, instant oatmeal, and small containers of soy- and rice milk.
  • Dining Out: Look for ethnic restaurants, especially Japanese, Chinese, Indian, Mexican, and Italian, as they normally have many vegetarian dishes.
    • Japanese: vegetable sushi
    • Chinese: lots of rice with smaller amounts of vegetable dish; request oil-free and sauce on the side
    • Mexican: bean burrito, hold the cheese, sour cream, and guacamole; Spanish rice. Ask the waiter to bring out warm corn tortillas to dip in the salsa and to take away the fried chips.
    • Italian: pasta e fagioli (soup); pasta marinara. Ask that oil be kept at an absolute minimum.
    • Thai: vegetarian selections with lots of rice; avoid coconut milk
    • Indian: rice dishes or breads (beware of curries—very fatty)
    • Middle Eastern: couscous; baba ganouj and hummus with lots of pita bread
    • American: vegetable plate; salad bar; baked potato; baked beans; spaghetti; fruit plate. For salads, ask for no dressing, or try lemon or lime juice or soy or teriyaki sauce. Ask that fatty toppings, such as cheese, bacon, eggs, olives, and avocados, be left off.

AT WORK: Keep the following on hand.

  • Instant soups
  • 3-bean salad
  • Rice cakes
  • Bagels
  • Fresh or dried fruit
  • Bean dip with rice cakes or fat-free chips

CRAVINGS:

  • Stock up on healthful foods at home and at work to prevent hunger-induced indiscretions.
  • Keep unhealthful foods out of the house. Donate non-perishable items that aren’t allowed in the diet to your local food pantry.
  • If you follow a very low-fat menu, your tastes will gradually drift to prefer lower-fat foods.

TROUBLESHOOTING:

  • What to tell others:
    • “I’m following a low-fat [or vegetarian] diet right now.”
    • “I’m trying to increase my fruit and vegetable intake and cut out some fat.”
  • If beans give you gas, use less beans and more grains and meat analogs.

Three-week Vegan Weight Loss Menu

Week 1

Day 1
Breakfast
Oatmeal made with raisins topped with a banana and soymilk
Whole-wheat toast and jam
Calcium-fortified orange juice

Snack
Apple

Lunch
Potato Vegetable Soup
Veggie burger on a whole-grain bun
Fruit cup

Snack
Non-fat soy latte

Dinner
Miso soup
Vegetable stir-fry made with broccoli, carrots, and bok choy
Low-fat tofu
Brown rice
Sliced mangoes

Day 2
Breakfast
Quick Breakfast Pudding
Whole-wheat bagel and jam
Grapefruit wedges

Snack
Banana

Lunch
Hummus pita stuffed with veggies
Lentil soup
Baby carrots
Pretzels

Snack
Baked tortilla chips and salsa

Dinner
Pasta with Roasted Vegetables
Whole-wheat French bread
Fruit salad

Day 3
Breakfast
Whole grain cold cereal (like Shredded Wheat) topped with soymilk and berries
Strawberry Smoothie

Snack
Toasted pita bread with Lentil Pâté

Lunch
Black Bean Burritos
Baked tortilla chips
Spanish Bulgur
Fruit salad

Snack
Plum

Dinner
Broccoli with Kasha and Black Bean Sauce
Salad with non-fat dressing
Whole-wheat breadsticks

Day 4
Breakfast
Tofu Scramble
Whole-wheat toast with jam
Orange slices

Snack
Banana

Lunch
Sandwich made with whole-wheat bread, fat-free vegetarian turkey slices, lettuce, tomato, and mustard
Baked chips
Apple
Baby carrots

Snack
Whole wheat pita toasted and topped with Maple Potato Spread

Dinner
Indian Split Pea Dahl
Golden Mushroom Soup
Grapes
Gingerbread

Day 5
Breakfast
Oatmeal topped with maple syrup
Apple Oat Muffins
Calcium-fortified orange juice

Snack
Celery sticks dipped in Creamy Dill Dressing

Lunch
Almost Instant Black Bean Chili
Fat-free crackers
Salad with fat-free dressing
Apple

Snack
Brown rice cakes topped with jam

Dinner
Hearty Barbecue Beans
Veggie hot dog
Braised Collards or Kale
Fruit salad
Cornbread

Day 6
Breakfast
Banana French Toast
Fat-free soy sausage
Orange Julius

Snack
Air-popped popcorn

Lunch
Thai Wraps
Carrot sticks
Fruit salad

Snack
Dried figs

Dinner
Vegetable plate made with

Day 7
Breakfast
Muesli
Whole-wheat English muffin with apple butter
Grapefruit juice

Snack
Vegetable juice and pretzels

Lunch
Missing Egg Sandwich
Baked chips
Apple

Snack
Soy yogurt topped with fruit or whole grain cereal

Dinner
Snack
Plum

Dinner
Broccoli with Kasha and Black Bean Sauce
Salad with non-fat dressing
Whole-wheat breadsticks

Week 2

Day 1
Breakfast
Whole grain cold cereal with low-fat rice milk and strawberries
Whole-wheat bagel with hummus
Apple juice

Snack
Rice cakes with Garlic Bean Dip

Lunch
Mushroom Barley Soup
Soy hot dog on whole-wheat bun
Melon wedges

Snack
Soy yogurt

Dinner
Vegetarian Swiss Steak
Applesauce
Golden Potatoes
Sautéed Broccoli with Ginger
Banana Pudding

Day 2
Breakfast
Yam Spice Muffins
Sliced melons, grapes, and bananas topped with low-fat granola
Calcium-fortified orange juice

Snack
Dried figs

Lunch
Quickie Quesadillas
Carrot sticks
Mango slices

Snack
Cranberry Papaya Juice

Dinner
Simple Pasta Supper
Garlic Bread
Mixed salad greens with low-fat dressing
Gingered Melon Wedges

Day 3
Breakfast
Baked Oatmeal
Soy sausage
Grapefruit juice

Snack
Banana

Lunch
Hummus sandwich on whole-wheat bread
Corn and red pepper salad
Baked chips
Apple

Snack
Sorbet with fruit

Dinner
Black Bean Pueblo Pie
Sure-Fire Roasted Vegetables
Summer Fruit Compote

Day 4
Breakfast
Cream of wheat cereal with jam swirled in
Banana
Orange juice

Snack
Grapes

Lunch
Sloppy Joes
Mixed green salad
Baked chips

Snack
Toasted pita wedges with Spicy Black Beans and Tomatoes

Dinner
Ginger Noodles
Steamed edamame (green soybeans)
Strawberry Applesauce

Day 5
Breakfast

Wheat flake cereal with raisins and soymilk
Whole-wheat toast with jam
Grapefruit half

Snack
Air-popped popcorn

Lunch
Submarine Sandwich
Baby carrots
Baked beans

Snack
Chilled Cucumber-Dill Soup

Dinner
Lentil Burgers
Roasted Sweet Potato Wedges
Salad of Color
Gingerbread Cookies

Day 6
Breakfast
Oatmeal with dried fruit and ground flaxseed
Half whole-wheat bagel with raspberry jam
Orange juice

Snack
Low fat granola bar

Lunch
Banana and Raisin Sandwich
Low-fat whole-wheat crackers
Hoppin’ John Salad

Snack
Soy yogurt topped with whole grain cereal

Dinner
Bean Curd in Sweet and Sour Plum Sauce
Brown Rice
Asian Fusion Salad
Apple Crisp

Day 7
Breakfast
Fruited Breakfast Quinoa
Applesauce with cinnamon
Orange juice

Snack
Banana

Lunch
Lentil Salad
Whole-wheat roll with jam
Tossed salad with Basic Flax Oil and Vinegar Dressing

Snack
Low-fat crackers with Cheesy Garbanzo Spread

Dinner
Penne with Fresh Spinach, Tomatoes, and Olives
Bruschetta
Rootin’ Tootin’ Salad
Nutty Fruitballs

Week 3

Day 1
Breakfast
Spiced Pumpkin Pancakes
Grapefruit and orange wedges
Green tea

Snack
Creamy Chocolate Pudding

Lunch
Meatball sandwich made with Spaghetti Balls
Stuffed Tomato Salad
Carrot sticks

Snack
Baked chips and salsa

Dinner
Neat Loaf
Zucchini Skillet Hash
Whole-wheat rolls
Brownies

Day 2
Breakfast
Black Beans with Salsa on Toast
Apple juice

Snack
Half a whole-wheat bagel with hummus

Lunch
Lentils Soup
Sandwich made with veggie deli slices, lettuce, tomato, mustard, and whole-wheat bread
Tossed salad

Snack
Orange

Dinner
Tempeh Broccoli Sauté
Yams with Cranberries and Apples
Brown rice
Fruit cup

Day 3
Breakfast
Whole grain cold cereal with sliced bananas and rice milk
Pumpkin Spice Muffins
Tea

Snack
Sorbet with Berry Sauce

Lunch
Chunky Ratatouille Sauce over whole-wheat pasta
Fruit cocktail in light syrup

Snack
Pita wedges with Tofu Spread

Dinner
Veggie Confetti Couscous
Tofu Tacos
Cucumber, Mango, and Spinach Salad
Pumpkin Custard Pie

Day 4
Breakfast
Breakfast Rice Pudding
Whole grain toast with apple butter

Snack
Air-popped popcorn topped with Sesame Salt

Lunch
Corn Chowder
Veggie burger on a whole grain bun
Tossed salad with fat-free Italian dressing

Snack
Schoolyard Oatmeal Cookies

Dinner
Tamale Pie
Steamed Asparagus with Raspberry Sauce
Tofu Vegetable Soup
Sliced kiwifruit and grapes

Day 5
Breakfast
Cornmeal Pancakes
Cantaloupe wedges
Calcium-fortified orange juice

Snack
Chocolate Banana Smoothie

Lunch
Kale-and-Rice Chowder
Whole grain roll

Snack
Plum

Dinner
Vegetable Rotini with Ginger Peanut Sauce
Cucumbers with Creamy Dill Dressing
French bread

Day 6
Breakfast
Tofu French Toast
Sliced bananas
Cranberry juice

Snack
Soy yogurt with chopped fruit added

Lunch
Veggie burger on whole-wheat bun
Vegetarian baked beans
Fresh Spinach Salad

Snack
Fresh Collard Apple Juice

Dinner
Homestyle Squash and Pinto Beans with Rice
Warm corn tortillas
Sliced mangoes
Tossed salad

Day 7
Breakfast
Oatmeal topped with cinnamon and soymilk
Honeydew melon
Calcium-fortified orange juice

Snack
Low-fat crackers with hummus

Lunch
Pasta Salad
Karen’s Sloppy Tofu
Baked potato chips

Snack
Fresh Collard Apple Juice

Dinner
Ravioli with Fresh Mushrooms and Tomato Sauce
Creamy Beet Soup
Tossed salad with low-fat vinaigrette
Fruit cup

 

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